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Tag Archives: SMP 8

A Heuristic Approach to Angles in Circles

I am taking a qualitative research class right now, and my mind is full of lots of new-to-me words (many of which my spell checker doesn’t know, either): hermeneutics, phenomenology, ethnography, ethnomethodology, interpretivism, postpositivism, etc. One that has struck me is heuristic, the definition of which I can actually remember because I try to teach heuristically. (The word does not yet roll off of my tongue, but the definition, I get.)

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On Monday, our content was G-C.A Understand and apply theorems about circles

  1. Identify and describe relationships among inscribed angles, radii, and chords. Include the relationship between central, inscribed, and circumscribed angles; inscribed angles on a diameter are right angles; the radius of a circle is perpendicular to the tangent where the radius intersects the circle.

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We started with a Quick Poll. I asked students for their best guess for the angle measure. I showed the results without displaying the correct answer, noting the lowest and highest guesses.

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Students moved to the technology. What happens to the angle measures as you move the points on the circle?

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They moved to the next page, which revealed more information. What happens to the angle measures as you move the points on the circle?

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I sent the poll again. There was one team who hadn’t answered yet, so I made a brief stop by their table. Last semester, I remember reading something about how a certain example might give students the eyes to see what you’re trying to get them to see. So we moved the points around to look something like this.

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If you have 49 and 43, how can you get 46?

Changing the numbers purposefully helped them see.

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I sent one more poll before we talked about why.

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So we gave our best guess, and then we used technology to explore. Students practiced MP8 I can look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning as they noticed what stayed the same and what changed with an angle whose vertex is in the center of the circle. They generalized the result. But we hadn’t yet discussed why that happens.

Students practice MP7 I can look for and make use of structure. By now they know our mantra for MP7: What can you make visible that isn’t yet pictured?

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I saw a line constructed parallel to the given line, which made alternate interior angles visible.

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I saw a chord drawn that made a triangle visible.

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I asked students to write down everything they knew about the angles in this diagram.

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They made suggestions about what we know. They didn’t say the relationships exactly like I would. I wrote them down anyway. They didn’t recognize the exterior angle of the triangle and so ending up proving the Exterior Angle Theorem again off to the side. I wrote it down anyway.

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And so the journey continues, always trying to enable my students to discover or learn something for themselves (and sometimes succeeding) …

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Posted by on February 9, 2017 in Circles, Geometry

 

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Notice & Note: Dilations

How do you give your students the opportunity to practice MP8: I can look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning?

SMP8 #LL2LU Gough-Wilson

We started our dilations unit practicing MP8, noticing and noting.

 

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What would you want students to notice and note?

How do students learn what is important to notice and note?

An important consideration when learning with self-explanation is to look at the quality of the explanation itself. What are the students saying or writing? Are they just regurgitating bits of text or making connections to underlying principles? Do the explanations contain predictions about what is going to happen, try to go beyond the given instruction or do they just superficially gloss over what is already there? Students who make principle-based, anticipative, or inference-containing explanations benefit the most from self-explaining. If students seem to be failing to make good explanations, one can try to give prompts with more assistance. In practice, this will likely take iteration by the instructor to figure out what combination of content, activity and prompt provides the most benefit to students. (Chiu & Chi, 2014, p. 99)

We had a brief discussion about what might be important to notice and note. We’ve also been working on predictions, thinking about what you expect to happen before trying it with technology:

What happens when the center of dilation is on the figure, outside the figure, and inside the figure?

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What happens when the scale factor is greater than 1? Equal to 1? Between 0 and 1? Less than 0?

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I observed, walking around the room and using Class Capture, selecting conversations for our whole class discussion.

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Here’s what NA noticed and noted.

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We looked at Hannah’s Rectangle, from NCSM’s Congruence and Similarity PD Module. Students had a straightedge and piece of tracing paper.

Which rectangles are similar to rectangle a? Explain the method you used to decide.Hannahs Rectangle.png

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What would you do next? Would you show the correct responses? Or not?

Would you start with an incorrect answer? or a correct answer?

Would you regroup students based on their responses?

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I started with a student who didn’t select G and then one who did. Then I asked a student who selected C to share why he chose C and didn’t choose F. We ended by watching Randy’s explanation on the module video.

And so the journey continues, always wondering what comes next (and sometimes wondering what should have come first) …


Chiu, J.L, & Chi, M.T.H. (2014). Supporting self-explanation in the classroom. In V. A. Benassi, C. E. Overson, & C. M. Hakala (Eds.). Applying science of learning in education: Infusing psychological science into the curriculum. Retrieved from the Society for the Teaching of Psychology web site: http://teachpsych.org/ebooks/asle2014/index.php

 

 
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Posted by on December 19, 2016 in Dilations, Geometry

 

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Notice and Note: Dilations

Are you familiar with Notice & Note: Strategies for Close Reading? Here’s a link to Heinemann’s Notice & Note learning community, and here’s a sample PDF. I wonder whether our Standards for Mathematical Practice are similar to the Notice and Note literary signposts.

It’s not enough to just read a text. We want students to read for understanding and comprehension. The literary signposts help students with close reading of a literary text.

Similarly, it’s not enough to just explore math with dynamic graphs and geometry. We want students to explore for understanding and comprehension. The math practices help students learn how to interact with a mathematical problem or concept … and what to notice.

 

Last week, we explored dilations.

What do you need for a dilation?

A figure, a point (which we’ll call the center of dilation), and a number (which we’ll call the scale factor)

We used our dynamic geometry software to perform a dilation.

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About what things might you be curious as you explore dilations?

(I thought of Kristin when I used the word curious.)

What happens when the center of dilation is inside the pre-image?

What happens when the center of dilation is on the pre-image? (on a side, on a vertex)

What happens when the scale factor is between 0 and 1?
What happens when the scale factor is negative?

How do the corresponding side lengths in the pre-image and image relate to each other?

 

I asked students to practice look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning as they explored the dilation. Do you know what it means to look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning?

Find a pattern.

Yes. Figure out what changes and what stays the same as you take a dynamic action on the dilation. Begin to make some generalizations about what you notice.

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And don’t just notice, but actually note what you’re thinking.

The room got quiet as students noticed and noted their observations about dilations. I monitored student work both using Class Capture and walking around to see what students were noting.

(I promise I’ve tried to make it clear to students that dilation has 3 syllables and not 4 … but we do live in the South.)

Eventually, they shared some of their findings with their team, and then I selected a few to note their observations for the whole class.

BB showed us what happened when he perfomed a dilation with a scale factor of -1. He had noted that it was the same as rotating the pre-image 180˚ about the center of dilation.

SA talked with us about when the dilation would be a reduction. She had decided it wasn’t enough to say a scale factor less than 1 or a fractional scale factor but that we needed to say a scale factor between 0 and 1 or between -1 and 0.

FK showed us that when she drew a line connecting a pre-image point and its image, the line also contained the center of dilation.

PS noted that when the scale factor was 2, the length of the segment from the center of dilation to a pre-image point equaled the length of the segment from the pre-image point to its image.

When the scale factor was 3, the length of the segment from the center of dilation to a pre-image point equaled one-half the length of the segment from the pre-image point to its image.

 

We next determined a dilation and set of rigid motions would show that the two figures are similar.

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Translate ∆DET using vector EY.

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Rotate ∆D’E’T’ about Y using angle D’YA.

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Dilate ∆D’’E’’T’’ about Y using scale factor AY/D’’Y.

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Then we looked at dilations in the coordinate plane. I knew that my students had some experience with this from middle school, and so I sent a Quick Poll to see what they remembered.

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Due to the success on the first question, I changed it up a bit with the second question.

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But I wonder now whether I should have started with the second question. If they could do the second question, doesn’t that tell me they can also do the first?

I’ve rearranged the polls to try that the next time I teach dilations.

 

We ended the lesson with a triangle that had been dilated. Where is the center of dilation?

And so the journey continues, with hope that noticing & noting will make a difference in what students learn and remember …

 
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Posted by on November 17, 2015 in Dilations, Geometry

 

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