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Category Archives: Circles

A Heuristic Approach to Angles in Circles

I am taking a qualitative research class right now, and my mind is full of lots of new-to-me words (many of which my spell checker doesn’t know, either): hermeneutics, phenomenology, ethnography, ethnomethodology, interpretivism, postpositivism, etc. One that has struck me is heuristic, the definition of which I can actually remember because I try to teach heuristically. (The word does not yet roll off of my tongue, but the definition, I get.)

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On Monday, our content was G-C.A Understand and apply theorems about circles

  1. Identify and describe relationships among inscribed angles, radii, and chords. Include the relationship between central, inscribed, and circumscribed angles; inscribed angles on a diameter are right angles; the radius of a circle is perpendicular to the tangent where the radius intersects the circle.

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We started with a Quick Poll. I asked students for their best guess for the angle measure. I showed the results without displaying the correct answer, noting the lowest and highest guesses.

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Students moved to the technology. What happens to the angle measures as you move the points on the circle?

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They moved to the next page, which revealed more information. What happens to the angle measures as you move the points on the circle?

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I sent the poll again. There was one team who hadn’t answered yet, so I made a brief stop by their table. Last semester, I remember reading something about how a certain example might give students the eyes to see what you’re trying to get them to see. So we moved the points around to look something like this.

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If you have 49 and 43, how can you get 46?

Changing the numbers purposefully helped them see.

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I sent one more poll before we talked about why.

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So we gave our best guess, and then we used technology to explore. Students practiced MP8 I can look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning as they noticed what stayed the same and what changed with an angle whose vertex is in the center of the circle. They generalized the result. But we hadn’t yet discussed why that happens.

Students practice MP7 I can look for and make use of structure. By now they know our mantra for MP7: What can you make visible that isn’t yet pictured?

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I saw a line constructed parallel to the given line, which made alternate interior angles visible.

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I saw a chord drawn that made a triangle visible.

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I asked students to write down everything they knew about the angles in this diagram.

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They made suggestions about what we know. They didn’t say the relationships exactly like I would. I wrote them down anyway. They didn’t recognize the exterior angle of the triangle and so ending up proving the Exterior Angle Theorem again off to the side. I wrote it down anyway.

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And so the journey continues, always trying to enable my students to discover or learn something for themselves (and sometimes succeeding) …

 
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Posted by on February 9, 2017 in Circles, Geometry

 

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MP6 – Defining Terms

Screenshot 2016-01-27 09.07.23.pngHow do you provide your students the opportunity to attend to precision?

1-screen-shot-2016-10-25-at-1-18-52-pmWriting sound definitions is a good practice for students, making all of us pay close attention to what something is and is not.

I’ve learned from Jessica Murk about Bongard Problems, which give students practice creating sound definitions based on what something is and is not.

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What can you say about every figure on the left of the page that is not true about every figure on the right side of the page? (Bongard Problem #16)

Last year when I asked students to define circle, I found it hard to select and sequence the responses that would best contribute to a whole class discussion without taking too much class time.

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I remember reading Dylan Wiliam’s suggestion in Embedding Formative Assessment (chapter 6, page 147) to have students give feedback to student responses that aren’t from their own class. I think it’s still helpful for students to spend time writing their own definition, and possibly trying to break a partner’s definition, but I wonder whether using some of last year’s responses to drive a whole class discussion this year might be helpful.

  • a shape with no corners
  • A circle is a shape that is equal distance from the center.
  • a round shape whose angles add up to 360 degrees
  • A circle is a two-dimensional shape, that has an infinite amount of lines of symmetry, and a total of 360 degrees.
  • A 2-d figure where all the points from the center to the circumference are equidistant.

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We recently discussed trapezoids.

Based on the diagram, how would you define trapezoid?

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Does how you define trapezoid depend on how you construct it?

Can you construct a dynamic quadrilateral with exactly one pair of parallel sides?

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And so the #AskDontTell journey continues …

 
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Posted by on November 14, 2016 in Circles, Geometry, Polygons

 

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MP5 – The Center of the Circle

How do you give students the opportunity to practice “I can use appropriate tools strategically”?

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How would your students find the center of a circle?

Every year, I am amazed at the connections students make between properties of circles that we have explored and what the center of the circle has to do with those properties.

We started on paper.

Some students moved their thoughts to technology.

Whose work would you select for an individual and/or whole class discussion?

Could we use the tangents to a circle from a point to find the center of the circle?

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Could we use the intersection of the angle bisectors of an equilateral triangle inscribed in a circle to find the center of the circle?

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Could we use the perpendicular bisector of a chord of a circle to find the center of the circle?

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Could we use the intersection of the perpendicular bisectors of a pentagon circumscribed about a circle to find the center of the circle?

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Could we use the intersection of the perpendicular bisectors of several chords of a circle to find the center of the circle?

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Could we use a right triangle inscribed in a circle to find the center of the circle?

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And so the journey continues …

 
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Posted by on September 15, 2016 in Circles, Geometry

 

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What’s My Rule?

We practice “I can look for and make use of structure” and “I can look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning” almost every day in geometry.

This What’s My Rule? relationship provided that opportunity, along with “I can attend to precision”.

What rule can you write or describe or draw that maps Z onto W?

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As students first started looking, I heard some of the following:

  • positive x axis
  • x is positive, y equals 0
  • they come together on (2,0)
  • (?,y*0)
  • when z is on top of w, z is on the positive side on the x axis

 

Students have been accustomed to drawing auxiliary objects to make use of the structure of the given objects.

As students continued looking, I saw some of the following:

Some students constructed circles with W as center, containing Z. And with Z as center, containing W.

Others constructed circles with W as center, containing the origin. And with Z as center, containing the origin.

Others constructed a circle with the midpoint of segment ZW as the center.

Another student recognized that the distance from the origin to Z was the same as the x-coordinate of W.

And then made sense of that by measuring the distance from W to the origin as well.

Does the redefining Z to be stuck on the grid help make sense of the relationship between W and Z?

 

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As students looked for longer, I heard some of the following:

  • The length of the line segment from the origin to Z is the x coordinate of W.
  • w=((distance of z from origin),0)
  • The Pythagorean Theorem

Eventually, I saw a circle with the origin as center that contained Z and W.

I saw lots of good conversation starters for our whole class discussion when I collected the student responses.

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And so, as the journey continues,

Where would you start?

What questions would you ask?

How would you close the discussion?

 

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Notice and Note: The Equation of a Circle

I wrote in detail last year about how our students practice I can look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning to make sense of the equation of a circle in the coordinate plane.

This year we took the time not only to notice what changes and what stays the same but also to note what changes and what stays the same.

Our ELA colleagues have been using Notice and Note as a strategy for close reading for a while now. How might we encourage our learners to Notice and Note across disciplines?

Students noticed and noted what stays the same and what changes as we moved point P.

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They made a conjecture about the path P follows, and then we traced point P.

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We connected their noticings about the Pythagorean Theorem to come up with the equation of the circle.

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Students moved a circle around in the coordinate plane to notice and note what happens with the location of the circle, size of the circle, and equation of the circle.

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And then most of them told me the equation of a circle with center (h,k) and radius r, along with giving us the opportunity to think about whether square of (x-h) is equivalent to the square of (h-x).

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And so the journey continues … with an emphasis on noticing and noting.

 

 

 
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Posted by on March 19, 2016 in Circles, Geometry

 

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The Circumference of a Cylinder

We talked about pi earlier this week in geometry, and we used Andrew Stadel’s water bottle question to start.

I’m not one to pull of the wager that Andrew used (unfortunately, my students will agree that I am a bit too serious for that), but we still had an interesting conversation.

Compare the circumference and height of the water bottle.

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Here’s what they estimated by themselves.

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Then they faced left if they thought height > circumference, straight if =, and right if height < circumference. (I saw Andrew lead this at CMC-South year before last … I certainly didn’t think of it myself.) They found someone who agreed with their answer, and practiced I can construct a viable argument and critique the reasoning of others.

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Next they found a second person who agreed, and practiced I can construct a viable argument and critique the reasoning of others again. (By this time, we decided it was easier to raise 1, 2, or 3 fingers based on answer choice rather than turn a certain direction as it was a challenge for some to see someone turned the same direction.) Finally, they found someone who disagreed, and practiced I can construct a viable argument and critique the reasoning of others.

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I sent the poll again.

It didn’t change much.

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So without discussion, I sent a poll with a bit more context … a cylindrical can holding 3 tennis balls. Would the can of tennis balls help them reason abstractly and quantitatively?

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Apparently not.

Here’s what they thought by themselves.

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And here’s what they thought after talking with someone else.

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The clock was ticking. I still wanted us to talk about pi. I asked someone who correctly answered to share her thinking with the rest of the class to convince them. And we used string to show that the water bottle circumference was, in fact, longer than its height.

I intended to follow up with this Quick Poll. But I was in a hurry and forgot. Maybe next year.

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You can find more number sense ideas from Andrew here.

I’ll look forward to hearing about how they play out in your classroom, as the journey continues …

 
 

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Ask, Don’t Tell

I was invited to write a few posts for NCTM’s Mathematics Teacher Blog: Joy and Inspiration in the Mathematics Classroom.

Ask, Don’t Tell (Part 4): The Equation of a Circle

Ask, Don’t Tell (Part 3): Special Right Triangles

Ask, Don’t Tell (Part 2): Pythagorean Relationships

Ask, Don’t Tell (Part 1): Special Segments in Triangles

While you’re there, be sure to catch up on any other posts you haven’t read. There are some great ones by Matt Enlow, Chris Harrow, and Kathy Erickson.

“Ask Don’t Tell” learning opportunities allow the mathematics that we study to unfold through questions, conjectures, and exploration. “Ask Don’t Tell” learning opportunities begin to activate students as owners of their learning.

I haven’t always provided “Ask Don’t Tell” learning opportunities for my students. My coworkers and I spend our common planning time thinking through questions that we can ask to bring out the mathematics. We plan learning episodes so that students can learn to ask questions as well. (Have you read Make Just One Change: Teach Students to Ask Their Own Questions?)

After the Special Right Triangles post, someone commented on NCTM’s fb page something like the following: “Really? You told students the relationships without any explanation?”

I have always used the Pythagorean Theorem to show why the relationship between the legs and hypotenuse in a 45˚-45˚-90˚ is what it is. But I think that’s different from “Ask Don’t Tell”.

I have been teaching high school for over 20 years. And yes. I really used to tell my geometry students the equation of the circle. I told them definitions for special segments in triangles along with drawing a diagram. I told them how to determine whether a triangle was right, acute, or obtuse. And I told them the relationships between the legs and hypotenuse for 45˚-45˚-90˚ and 30˚-60˚-90˚ triangles.

I’ve also been in meetings with teachers who have not thought about decomposing a square into 45˚-45˚-90˚ triangles or an equilateral triangle into 30˚-60˚-90˚ triangles to make sense of the relationships between side lengths.

You can see on the transparency from which I used to teach that I actually did go through an example where an equilateral triangle was decomposed into 30˚-60˚-90˚ triangles; even so, I failed to provide students the opportunity to look for and make use of structure.

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Purposefully creating a learning opportunity so that the mathematics unfolds for students through questions, conjectures, and exploration is different from telling students the mathematics, even with an explanation for why.

As you reflect on your previous school year and plan for your upcoming school year, what #AskDontTell opportunities do and can you provide?

 

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