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Popcorn Picker + #ShowYourWork

11 Sep

Towards the end of our geometry course last year, we focused on students being able to say:

I can show my work.

How often do our students understand what we mean when we say, “show your work”?

Jill Gough’s Show Your Work learning progression has been an important addition to our classroom.

Level 4: I can show more than one way to find a solution to the problem.

Level 3: I can describe or illustrate how I arrived at a solution in a way that the reader understands without talking to me.

Level 2: I can find a correct solution to the problem.

Level 1: I can ask questions to help me work toward a solution to the problem.

A correct solution isn’t enough … we want the reader (and sometimes grader) to understand our solution without having to ask any questions.

We continue to use Dan Meyer’s Popcorn Picker 3-Act, even though I keep thinking we shouldn’t need to do this in high school. The Quick Poll results, however, provide evidence that we aren’t wasting our time.

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You can read more about how the 3-Act lesson played out in last year’s post.

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My purpose for posting about the lesson again is to consider the value added when we ask students to practice “show your work” and provide students the opportunity to give other students feedback on what they’ve shown … when we provide students an opportunity to practice SMP3, “I can construct a viable argument and critique the reasoning of others”.

We used the “I like …, I wish …, What if (or I wonder) …” protocol for providing feedback.

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Kato Nims recently posted Illuminating Success and Growth, where she shares her students’ first attempts at giving feedback to each other this year. She writes, “It is clear to me that as our work together continues that it will be important for me to model how to give effective feedback so that we can all benefit from the unique perspectives that are represented in our classroom.”

Some of the feedback that my students gave each other is helpful, but more of it is not. How do we teach students to give productive feedback to each other? Would my giving feedback on the feedback have been helpful? At what point have we spent too much time on this activity and need to call it “done”? But then how often am I so focused on teaching content that I neglect to provide students the opportunity to grow as learners? Isn’t learning how to give feedback important for all of us? The tasks we choose are so important … which ones will further both our content and our practice learning goals?

And so the journey continues … with many more questions than answers.

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